Last Saturday I had the pleasure of presenting with a wonderful colleague of mine, Sam, at the ICTEV Creating Connections Conference 2012. Sam, who is our college’s Prep Team Leader, is known throughout the college for both his high level of teaching ability but also his ability to integrate ICT in to his teaching and learning programs.

The topic of our presentation at ICTEV was titled, ‘Movie making on the iPad, so easy a 5 year old could do it’. Our session involved running participants through how to create simple yet effective movies on the iPad device with just a few simple applications, the main two of these being Doodle Buddy, which is a great free app for image creation, and StoryRobe. This app is an iPhone app however still works great on the iPad device. StoryRobe lets students take photos and create sketches that allow them to sequence, narrate and render films. Photo’s can also be imported from the camera roll and this is where Doddle Buddy is great for that.

The other major component of our session was showcasing and demonstrating the great work our prep’s have been doing in relation to creationg StopMotion Animation pieces! I have asked Sam to write a guest post which is below! I have also added several short videos that the prep’s have completed in class!

Thanks!

 

I’ll never again be surprised by the abilities of five year olds. I probably shouldn’t be already considering some of the amazing things they’ve already done on iPads and their ability to learn so quickly in general, but when I decided to introduce Stop Motion animation this term, I’ve been staggered at how quickly the Preps have picked it up.

I’ve previously used stop motion with year 7 students. It’s a great hands on tool to engage boys and can be easily incorporated into numeracy, literacy and inquiry learning with a small amount of creativity. Generally speaking the kids loved it and self-taught themselves how to do it. All I needed to do was guide them with storyboarding and the odd quality control conversation.

Introducing it to five year olds is a different story. I want them to play with the technique to explore what it can and can’t do and what it looks like when it is done well and when it isn’t done well.

At Manor Lakes we spend the first two sessions on Monday through Thursday in our ‘Investigations’ time, which is based upon the Walker Learning Approach. Here student choice and interests shape the learning environment and although they hadn’t expressed an interest as such, I set up a ‘stop motion’ interest table to see what response I got. Sure enough the lure of using the iPad during investigations (which we normally haven’t) meant it was a popular choice. I chose a pair of students to teach the basics of the iMOTION HD app to, which took about 5 minutes. I then left the students to have a play to see what they would come up with.

Their first attempt wasn’t bad, but there were arms, hands and unwanted camera movement that could all be improved upon. I quizzed the students’ what did they like, what didn’t they like? They had noticed the hand movements . They had noticed it was too quick in places. I was suitably impressed.

The first pair of students made a cute little film of a tower of blocks being built and then vanishing. We showed it to the rest of the grade during reflection time and they loved it. They all wanted a turn. 

My two ‘experts’ then passed on the knowledge by sharing it with a pair of students from our neighboring class. They know are beginning to develop stop motions with blocks, cars and magnetic letters too!

I look forward to our ‘play’ with this animation technique developing into our Preppies developing story-based animations. I’ll be sure not to assume they can’t do it, that’s for sure, but for now I’ll be content knowing what they have already been able to master!